Reuters releases its best photographs of the year 2013

Posted By admin / January, 7, 2014 / 0 comments

The most astonishing pictures of 2013 – Reuters releases its best photographs of the year.


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See all at the Daily Mail website

 

 

Aerial Photography of Poland’s Lakes Shot Across Four Seasons

Posted By admin / September, 24, 2013 / 0 comments

Photographer Kacper Kowalski’s aerial photos of Poland make for a flattering introduction to the country. Protruding into the southern Baltic sea, Pomerania in Poland is well-known for its great areas of forests that are scattered with lakes and winding rivers. The Kashubian Lake District is a land of enormous forests, rolling hills, untamed ravines speckled with giant boulders, colorful fields, picturesque villages, active rivers and hundreds of beautiful lakes.

During fall, the diverse forest sites turn into a sea of colors, with the leaves wilting at varying degrees while exposing the deep undergrowth as well as waterways. While airborne from para-gliders and geo-planes, Kacper Kowalski has been photographing this beautiful area from the air for years. His glorious pictures demonstrate nature’s exquisiteness as it transforms through a year.

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Italian photographers win top prizes in Royal Photographic Society competition

Posted By admin / July, 24, 2013 / 0 comments

Antonio Busiello (first picture below) won for his photograph which ‘raises valid and contemporary questions about body image.

Judge Anthony Holland Parkin said: “The Cullatore struck a chord with a number of the judges. In a world obsessed with retouched perfection, Antonio’s honest image of a man proudly displaying his huge calluses challenges the viewer, and raises valid and contemporary questions, about body image.”

Busiello was one of 1,285 photographers from 59 countries to enter the competition, of which 115 were selected for the exhibition.

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Click here to see more photographs from the show

source: Independent UK

Banned Fashion Commercials

Posted By admin / May, 20, 2013 / 0 comments

Take a look at some of fashion campaigns that were banned in the UK and elsewhere.
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Tom Ford: Shot by Terry Richardson in 2007, this provocative Tom Ford campaign was criticized for its pornographic approach and was subsequently banned in several countries.


Levis: Banned in the UK, this advert from Levis went viral online. Featuring a supposedly blind man watching a woman strip in a public toilet, it has had over 26 millions views to date.


Part of Diesels ”Kick Ass” campaign. With the tagline ”Diesel Sneakers. Not made for Running. (Great for Kicking Asses)”, it was never released on TV but went viral online.

More at: Hunger TV

Color Consumption photo series by Design Army

Posted By admin / May, 14, 2013 / 0 comments

As though straight out of a Tim Burton film or, more commonly, a dream, the Color Consumption photo series deals and wheels in the surreal. As its title suggests, each image focuses on the use of saturated hues that help to create the fantastical feel present in the photographs. From hot pinks and bright blues to different shades of green, the colors are fun, playful and even a tad mysterious.

Shot by Design Army, a studio based in Washington, DC, and founded by husband and wife team Pum and Jake LeFebure, the Color Consumption photo series is a self-initiated project centered around their main inspiration

The husband-and-wife team behind Design Army can sum up what drives them in one word: color. “Color makes us feel alive. It fuels our minds, connects spirits, and feeds imaginations,” say Pum and Jake LeFebure, a design duo known predominantly for their layouts and publications. “It is everywhere when you look around. Everything on the planet is a color.”

This has led to Color Consumption, a self-initiated series of photographs focused on the couple’s main inspiration. The couple explains, “Color is a commodity. It is the ultimate currency to sustain and nourish our creative souls. It’s a design mantra we call ‘Color Consumption’.”

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See all pictures here

Source: trendland.com
More information at www.designarmy.com

Beyonce shows off bikini-body in Mrs. Carter H&M campaign

Posted By admin / April, 16, 2013 / 0 comments

Beyonce’s full summer ad campaign for H&M has been revealed, and she is definitely beach-body ready.

In a campaign titled “Beyonce as Mrs. Carter in H&M,” shot by Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin, Beyonce shows off her post-baby body in an array of colorful H&M swimwear cover-ups.

“I’ve always liked H&M’s focus on fun affordable fashion. I really loved the concept we collaborated on to explore the different emotions of women represented by the four elements — fire, water, earth and wind,” said Beyonce. “It was a beautiful shoot on a tropical island. It felt more like making a video than a commercial.”

The campaign, which was shot in the Bahamas earlier this year, will help promote her upcoming world tour. A full TV spot will also join the print campaign, and will feature a new song, “Standing on the Sun.”

Check out the complete photo shoot here.

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Beyonce Knowles ad campaign for H&M Credit: Courtesy of H&M

Victeerut at Elle Fashion Week Bangkok, March 2013

Posted By admin / March, 27, 2013 / 0 comments

The newest collection of Victeerut shown at Elle Fashion Week Bangkok in W Hotel on the 16th of March 2013.

For editorial usage, please contact us

Swedish Photographer Paul Hansen wins World Press Photo of the Year 2012

Posted By admin / February, 24, 2013 / 0 comments

The international jury of the 56th annual World Press Photo Contest has selected a picture by Paul Hansen of the Swedish daily Dagens Nyheter as the World Press Photo of the Year 2012. The picture shows a group of men carrying the bodies of two dead children through a street in Gaza City. They are being taken to a mosque for the burial ceremony while their father’s body is carried behind on a stretcher. Two-year-old Suhaib Hijazi and his older brother Muhammad were killed when their house was destroyed by an Israeli missile strike. Their mother was put in intensive care. The picture was made on 20 November 2012 in Gaza City, Palestinian Territories.

The jury gave prizes in nine themed categories to 54 photographers of 33 nationalities from: Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Iran, Italy, Jordan, Malaysia, Mexico, Palestinian Territories, the Netherlands, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Serbia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, USA, and Vietnam.

The members of the jury announced the winners at a press conference held at the World Press Photo office in Amsterdam on 15 February.

Comments on the winners by the jury
Mayu Mohanna, jury member from Peru, said of Paul Hansen’s winning picture: “The strength of the pictures lies in the way it contrasts the anger and sorrow of the adults with the innocence of the children. It’s a picture I will not forget.”

Santiago Lyon, vice president and director of photography at The Associated Press, spoke of the selection of prizewinners: “When I look at the results, as chair of the jury, I think that the World Press Photo of the Year, and all the other photos that were given prizes, were solid, stellar examples of first-rate photojournalism that is powerful, that is lasting, and that will reach whoever looks at them.”

The judging was conducted at the World Press Photo office in Amsterdam. All entries were anonymously presented to the jury, who discussed their merits over a two-week period. The jury operates independently and a secretary without voting rights safeguards the fairness of the procedure. The contest drew entries from professional press photographers, photojournalists and documentary photographers across the world. By the mid-January deadline, 103,481 images had been submitted by 5,666 photographers from 124 countries.

View all winners in the online gallery.

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How to make money from Stock Photography

Posted By admin / December, 23, 2012 / 0 comments

Source: dpreview.com

I make 90% of my living from Stock Photography, and have been doing it for over 20 years, so here are a few tips that might make it easier if you’re trying to get started.

1) You have to spread yourself as wide as possible. Don’t go with just one library, go with as many as you can. I have work with 16 currently.

2) You need quantity AND quality. There’s a rough guide that says that once you have a certain quantity online, you can expect to make an amount equal to $1 per image per year. However you need 1000’s up for sale before this kicks in.

3) Its a long term job. It can take years before you start to make any real money. People think its an easy option to make some money. Its not. It takes as much work and persistance to become successful, as it does to make a living from portraiture, weddings, advertisng, commercial etc.

4) One rejection is nothing. My first library wanted to see 1000 “sellable” shots before they took me on. The first batch was turned down, so I had to shoot another 1000!

5) Have a good look at whats out there. Check out all the sites, looking at what the competition for your kind of image is. Do you have better shots? If not why would anyone buy yours?

6) Ignore the fact that somebody on the internet said your pictures are good, ignore the fact that you have taken competition winners. Stock is about what designers and picture editors want. In virtually all cases, your images are there to serve the text, not vice-versa. Look in newspapers, magazines and on websites. How are pictures used? What kind of pictures are used? Many of the pictures you see are fairly ordinary, but most will be well composed and technically OK. My most sold image is of a bathroom!

7) Be prepared to work really hard and long. Shooting images, editing them, captioning and keywording them takes a long time.

8) Shoot ALL original images raw. The final product is going to be sold for download at jpg.8 usually, so shooting on jpg. originally means the image will degrade too much.

9) View all images at 100% to check for CA, fringing, noise, artefacts. Make sure your levels are within printable limits. Most libraries require 5 to 250. i.e. no pure white, no pure black.

10) Shoot everything you can at the lowest ISO possible, including interiors. If you don’t own a tripod, GET ONE!

11) Make sure your image is bright and well-exposed. Learn to get this right in-camera as it means less work later and your images will look better.

12) If you shoot travel, landscape etc. never shoot in dull, overcast light. Nobody is going to buy pictures like that, unless you are shooting extreme weather. Blue skies sell pictures.

13) If you shoot lifestyle, people etc. you will need model releases. You will also need to update these regularly as clothes, gadgets, cars, interior design etc. go out of fashion very quickly.

14) You may get get pictures rejected simply because the library has too many of the same, they don’t think it will sell or its technically poor. With the amount of images available, libraries can now be incredibly choosy about what they take. They expect top quality, both aesthetically and technically. If you can’t give them that, there are lots of others who can.

15) Stock photography is now global. You are competing with the whole world! Libraries tend to have all the pictures of cats, dogs, sunsets over lamposts, cute toddlers etc. they are ever going to need. Modern online libraries have millions of images online. Alamy in the UK has 20M + for example.

16) Does your image look good as a thumbnail? Because thats how people will view it first. What is going to make them click on it to see the larger version?

17) With regard to the above, keep it simple. If you need to write a couple of paragraphs to explain whats going on in your picture, then you are in trouble.

18) Stock photography is nothing to do with art.

19) Did I say stock photography is nothing to do with art?

20) With regard to 18 and 19, take as much trouble and care over photographing ordinary domestic objects or street furniture as you would over a glorious landscape or a beautiful model. If you do that you are in the ball park.

21) Don’t be afraid of the obvious. Don’t be afraid of simple. Just make sure your image is as close to technically perfect as you can make it.

23) Yes size does matter. The more MP’s you have the larger your image, the more potential it has to sell to the clients with the biggest budgets.

24) Actually reading the libraries submission guidelines helps. I used to run my own library and people who thought that they were “different” and could ignore my requirements got rejected. To be honest the technical standard of the material I received was also pretty dire on the whole. “It’ll do, its only for a library” seemed to be the attitude of many.

25) Finally, following on from the above, send only your “best” work to a library. Also send what people like. I use flickr a lot. I post several images and see what gets the most hits and the most positive comments. These are often not my personal favourites.

Still interested?

There are advantages.

1) You get to photograph what you want, when you want, in the way that you want.

2) If what you happen to like photographing has a market, you can do very well.

3) You have no client breathing down your neck and looking over your shoulder and giving you the benefit of their “artistic” advice.

4) If you shoot “non decade specific” images your pictures can have a very long “shelf life” and be earning you money for years.
5) You get to try your hand at all kinds of photography. Landscape is my love, but I’ve shot house interiors, industry, still life, performing arts, lifestyle, models, transport, animals, product shots and sport as well.

The most important lesson in all of this is to look at photography in all its commercial manifestations. Can you shoot an image like you see in the adverts, the billboard, the magazine article, the brochure etc. that pass your eyes every day. Absorb what you see, think how its done, say to yourself “Can I do that?” Chances are what you are looking at is a “Stock” photograph.

Its often been said that if Ansel Adams, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Man Ray etc, submitted images to a picture library they would probably get turned down.
Finally, I work 12 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year doing this. I happen to love it and think that I have the best job in the world, but not everybody feels he same. If it just turns into another chore, then it may not be for you.

© david taylor-hughes / soundimageplus

http://soundimageplus.blogspot.com/

 

Military photojournalist talks about life under fire in gripping new documentary

Posted By admin / December, 13, 2012 / 0 comments

source: imaging-resource.com

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to be a photojournalist for the military? As a photographer for the United States Air Force, Staff Sgt. Ryan Crane does just that, documenting life in the combat zone during recent deployments to Afghanistan.

A revealing new documentary by Hannah Hill, titled “Snap Snap Snap” (below), about Crane’s life and work is up on YouTube and it’s definitely worth checking out. (Running time is just under 15 minutes.) Crane, a Nikon shooter, also answered some questions about what it’s like to be a photographer in a combat zone in an informal Q&A on Reddit (read it here), where the documentary was first shared.

Read full article here

 

 

Sebastião Salgado in Siberia

Posted By admin / December, 8, 2012 / 0 comments

Source: guardian.co.uk

The Nenets of northern Siberia live at temperatures of -35C, wash just once a year and eat raw reindeer liver to survive. Photographer Sebastião Salgado travelled with them.

Eight years ago, at the age of 60, Sebastião Salgado set out on his most ambitious project. The photographer, best known for his painterly portraits of migrant communities and manual workers, decided to document the world’s pristine territories – areas untainted by the brutal grind of industry, exploitation and modern life.

Through his work, Salgado had seen so much horror – in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, he witnessed 10,000 people die in one day in the refugee camps of Goma. The playwright Arthur Miller once described Salgado’s pictures as an act of deep devotion, but the photographer returned from Exodus, a project about people fleeing genocide, with his faith in tatters. “I was injured in my heart and my spirit,” he says. “I came away from this with incredible despair.” So he embarked on Genesis, hoping it would be restorative, a celebration of the world’s natural beauty. (…..)

Read full article here

See all images here