I Am Fishead: Are Corporate Leaders Psychopaths?

Posted By admin / December, 6, 2012 / 0 comments

(by topdocumentaryfilms.com)

It is a well-known fact that our society is structured like a pyramid. The very few people at the top create conditions for the majority below. Who are these people? Can we blame them for the problems our society faces today? Guided by the saying “A fish rots from the head” we set out to follow that fishy odor. What we found out is that people at the top are more likely to be psychopaths than the rest of us.

Who, or what, is a psychopath? Unlike Hollywood’s stereotypical image, they are not always blood-thirsty monsters from slasher movies. Actually, that nice lady who chatted you up on the subway this morning could be one. So could your elementary school teacher, your grinning boss, or even your loving boyfriend.

The medical definition is simple: A psychopath is a person who lacks empathy and conscience, the quality which guides us when we choose between good and evil, moral or not. Most of us are conditioned to do good things. Psychopaths are not. Their impact on society is staggering, yet altogether psychopaths barely make up one percent of the population.

Through interviews with renowned psychologist Professor Philip Zimbardo, leading expert on psychopathy Professor Robert Hare, former President of Czech Republic and playwright Vaclav Havel, authors Gary Greenberg and Christopher Lane, professor Nicholas Christakis, among numerous other thinkers, we have delved into the world of psychopaths and heroes and revealed shocking implications for us and our society.
Watch the full documentary:

 

Lady Gaga by Jean-Paul Gaultier

Posted By admin / December, 5, 2012 / 0 comments

See the full documentary here:

 

 

Cloud Atlas – the best movie of 2012?

Posted By admin / December, 4, 2012 / 0 comments

Directed by: Tom Tykwer, Andy Wachowski, Lana Wachowski

“Cloud Atlas is unlike its contemporaries at the multiplex. It tells a big story in an engaging, difficult fashion. It has big names and a big budget. But it also is thematically dense… it wants to tell you something through plot, characters, dialogue and symbols. Cloud Atlas is also thankfully a very enjoyable film, much longer and denser than much of what is available today. “Ambition” defines this film.

In just under 3 hours, six radically different stories are told, and they appeal to a broad audience: a 19th century tale of unlikely brotherhood, the letters of a gay composer to his partner in the 1930’s, a San Francisco- set conspiracy in the 70’s, A hilarious account of an old publisher’s woes. A Blade Runner-esque clone’s struggle for freedom, and the survival of a tribe after ‘The Fall’. Genre conventions are toppled, as these stories with different tones are juggled in short intervals, leading from comedic highs to shocking drama in minutes.

But as with the characters, these plots are connected thematically, and clever wordplay and visual imagery links the stories, such as the end of a monologue referencing “the gates of Hell” and cutting to a shot of the gates of a building that, for Cavendish at least, is the gates of Hell. Each of the stories has strengths, a few have faults, but together the medley is incredible.

I found that while the earliest two stories began slowly and plainly, they developed very well and provided fantastic drama, especially the 1849 story. The Nuclear thriller was strong, Halle Berry is great and there are some real twists, and I also loved the ‘Dirty Harry’ and ‘China Syndrome’ vibes, but comedy bled into it from the 2012 story which diminished the climax. The 2012 story is hilarious, and its first scene is a standout; Tom Hanks is incredible as Dermot Hoggins. Although while the story is interesting, it doesn’t fit quite so well thematically- it’s almost too light. Listening to the ‘Cloud Atlas Sextet’ fits with all the stories, but can’t resonate with Cavendish’s. The future Korea is visually stunning and communicates its themes well, certainly the darkest plot, but the action can get over the top (Yes, I know who directed this) and there are some horrible clichés. But that scene of horrendous dialogue, the weakest in the film, can’t derail a great piece. Lastly is the bleak, Hawaii- set post-apocalyptic story. It was my favourite, possibly because I’m a sucker for anything involving apocalypse. But Hanks and Berry are fantastic again, the barbarians are menacing and scary, and the story is cool. It also concludes the film perfectly.

I’ve only talked about the plot! The actors really steal the show. In the credits, each actor’s name is placed with a clip of every one of their characters… everyone in the theatre stopped and stayed. People play characters you had no idea they played. A few highlights: Sturgess’ lawyer and the slave Autua, Frobisher, Hugh Grant’s sexist nuclear boss, Cavendish and Hanks’ Hoggins. Doona Bae as Somni and Hugo Weaving’s “Old Georgie” round it out- the latter is truly a demon. Much credit has to go to the makeup, literally making actors disappear into their roles. There is a huge number of transsexual and even race-bridging roles- it’s worthy of note that Lana Wachowski was at one point Larry Wachowski. Also deserving of praise, and possibly Oscars is the large scale visual effects that cover hundreds of years and look so believable. Sound quality is top-notch as well, listening to Old Georgie is chilling, as is the vision of Korean diners, and well… the whole future.

But all this plot serves a purpose, and Cloud Atlas intends to tell you things. Freedom is possibly the biggest theme, as well as the idea that our actions affect others greatly throughout time: we’re part of a large human network. Really though there’s so much to talk about you should just see the film. There are small stumbles every so often, but the structure hides them very well. No one story takes more time than others, no one character takes more time than others, and the structure and pacing drives the film forward briskly. It’s a shame this film hasn’t been better received commercially, because it’s a phenomenal achievement, interesting sci-fi and drama, and as of now, the best film I’ve seen in 2012. ”

Review by by Connor (Toronto, Canada), imdb.com

 

Fashion films get their own close-up as they evolve to rival catwalk shows

Posted By admin / December, 4, 2012 / 0 comments

By Metro.co.uk

Fashion film has evolved beyond videos of catwalks – and the big labels are starting to take notice

A blonde woman in a red fetish-style bikini moves to the slow beat of Love To Love You and an undercurrent of soft, ecstatic moans. She talks quietly in voiceover about her muscle-bound body: ‘I feel different to most women – stronger, leaner.’ She performs bicep curls with sculpted gold weights, the moans become louder.

Directed by Elisha Smith-Leverock, I Want Muscle won Grand Prize at last year’s ASVOFF Fashion Film Festival. Female bodybuilder Kizzy Vaines wore clothes by David Koma, Husam al Odeh, Lyall Hakaraia and Maria Francesca Pepe. The aim of the three-minute short, says Smith-Leverock, was to ‘play with taboos and gender stereotypes and to explore a different kind of female beauty’.

This weekend, the fifth ASVOFF film festival takes place at the Pompidou Centre in Paris. Over three days, visitors will be treated to filmwork as equally provocative and polished as Smith-Leverock’s.

Launched in 2008, ASVOFF has almost single-handedly encouraged an industry to reconsider the way it presents itself in film.

‘Fashion film is a vibrant, relatively new applied art form with huge potential,’ says founder Diane Pernet. ‘We’re still exploring exactly what the parameters are but I suppose the easiest way to define it is this: film where fashion is the protagonist, rather than a prop.’ (….)

Read more here (….)

 

New Car Commercials – Bentley GT, Rolls Royce Phantom

Posted By admin / December, 3, 2012 / 0 comments

We are continuing our work on car commercials. See our new clips:

More clips at Signature Car Hire YouTube Channel